In the midst of the national opioid epidemic, it’s no surprise that screenings for commonly abused drugs have become more and more commonplace. These initial screenings, often referred to as presumptive drug tests, will identify basic information about the patient’s drug use before a definitive screening pinpoints the more precise issue. Coding these presumptive drug tests has been done with a series of CPT codes since early 2017, but the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released a memo to remind everyone of the proper codes.

  • 80305: Drug tests(s), presumptive, any number of drug classes; any number of devices or procedures, (eg, immunoassay) capable of being read by direct optical observation only (eg, dipsticks, cups, cards, cartridges), includes sample validation when performed, per date of service
  • 80306: Drug tests(s), presumptive, any number of drug classes; any number of devices or procedures, (eg, immunoassay) read by instrument-assisted direct optical observation (eg, dipsticks, cups, cards, cartridges), includes sample validation when performed, per date of service
  • 80307: Drug tests(s), presumptive, any number of drug classes, qualitative, any number of devices or procedures; by instrument chemistry analyzers (eg, utilizing immunoassay [eg, EIA, ELISA, EMIT, FPIA, IA, KIMS, RIA]), chromatography (eg, GC, HPLC), and mass spectrometry either with or without chromatography, (eg, DART, DESI, GC-MS, GC-MS/MS, LC-MS, LC-MS/MS, LDTD, MALDI, TOF) includes sample validation when performed, per date of service

Keep in mind, however, that coders can only use one of these codes for presumptive drug tests per patient per date of service. Additionally, more codes may be needed later on to denote any definitive tests used to identify the specific substance(s) in question (a topic that is covered more in depth in another blog). If you work for a practice or facility that routinely performs these tests, be sure to review these codes in order to facilitate the best possible claims.